Cupid and Psyche: True Love Conquers All | Ancient Origins - myth story about cupid or eros

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myth story about cupid or eros - The myth of Psyche and Eros


In the love story of Eros (Cupid in Latin) and Psyche (meaning "soul" in Greek), we can see the perseverance of a man even when he is possessed by passion and the effort of a woman to overcome many obstacles in order to achieve the happiness of love. Discover the myth of Eros and Psyche The legendary beauty of Psyche. The myth of Psyche and Eros is probably one of the most beautiful Greek myths; it has been told and retold in several different versions and it has inspired artists all over the world.. The archetype of the Greek myth of Psyche and Eros appears regularly in movies and artifacts even today.

The tale of Cupid and Psyche (or "Eros and Psyche") is placed at the midpoint of Apuleius's novel, and occupies about a fifth of its total length. The novel itself is a first-person narrative by the protagonist Lucius. Transformed into a donkey by magic gone wrong, Lucius undergoes various trials and adventures, and finally regains human form by eating roses sacred to Isis. Eros as a Primordial Cosmic Force. The first of these is Hesiod’s Eros, a primordial being, “the most beautiful of the immortal gods,” one of the very first few deities that sprung into existence. In this story, Eros was the son of Chaos, and the brother of Gaea, Tartarus, Erebus, and Nyx.Author: Greekmythology.Com.

The Cupid Myth: The Story of Eros and Psyche. Cupid has always played a role in the celebrations of love and lovers. He is known as a mischievous, winged child, whose arrows who would pierce the hearts of his victims causing them to fall deeply in love. Originally, Cupid was known as Eros (love). Eros was a primordial being, thought to have arisen out of Chaos, along with Tartarus the Underworld and Gaia the Earth. Later Eros became associated with the love goddess Aphrodite, and he is often spoken of as Aphrodite's son Cupid, most notably in the myth of Cupid and Psyche.

The inserted story of Cupid and Psyche is found on pages 66-99. Lucius Apuleius was born about 124 in northern Africa and was educated in Carthage and Athens. The account of Cupid and Psyche is presented in his novel The Golden Ass (also titled The Metamorphoses.